Boulder, CO– A new survey of 1,000 women in the U.K. shows that the majority report being subjected to inappropriate comments and other unwanted sexual attention from their male coworkers and the primary harasser was a senior at their company.

The survey, which was conducted by the Slater Gordon law firm found that two-thirds of the women surveyed said a coworker made inappropriate comments about the their bodies, their clothing and their sex life. Twelve percent of respondents said that a male coworker at one point touched them inappropriately and one in six women said that a coworker tried to forcibly kiss them.

The majority of respondents, two-thirds said their harassers were married men and more than half of the men who engaged in the sexual misconduct were senior staff members. Of the women who were harassed by a senior staffer, 5 percent said they had lost their job and one in ten lost their job, according to HR Magazine.

Respondents said the most common places they experienced harassment was at their desk, when they working late at the office and at office parties, the employee hallway or the elevator.

Even though a large number of women admitted to being harassed, only 27 percent said they reported the behavior. There reasons for not reporting vary, some fear their allegations won’t be taken seriously or their employer will think they accusations are frivolous. But the biggest fear for most women who encounter sexual harassment is that they will be fired for speaking out and those are legitimate fears.

The women involved in the survey also said that after the harassment incident they were treated differently and were sometime humiliated or ignored by the harasser. One in five of the women reported they felt like leaving their jobs after being harassed.

“We are well in to the 21st century now and the message doesn’t seem to have got through to everyone that this just isn’t acceptable. Women have a right to go to work without having to fend off unwanted advances or inappropriate behavior from members of the opposite sex,” Clare Dawson and employment attorney for Slater Gordon told HR Magazine.

At one point it was common enough to be fired for reporting sexual harassment that the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 made it illegal for an employer to fire or otherwise punish an employee, or subject them to different types of harassment for reporting harassment.

“We see clients who have been blamed for bringing the treatment on themselves because of what they wear or how they are perceived by others, and clients who have been bullied, denied promotion or even physically assaulted when they refuse a colleague’s advances or make it clear that the harassment is not welcome,” Dawson said.

Though this survey was conducted in the United Kingdom, it likely gives an accurate snapshot of what is going on in Boulder and other American workplaces. The prevalence of sexual harassment and the victim’s reluctance to report it is a far too common. Luckily, a Boulder sexual harassment attorney will protect their clients from the harassment and hold an employer accountable for retaliation.